Bolting on the New Carb from Carl's Speed Shop

Since Ball's a speed freak, we decided to take the plunge with his Dyna Glide. The Ball Glide is a '92, with dependable performance from Bartels' performance products, and uses.080 shaved and ported heads, a BP 20 street, grunt cam, Bartels' one-off pipes, Screamin' Eagle Ignition and carb. The bike has always performed and held a constant 80 horses. It's no slouch. Carl went to work first removing the Screamin' Eagle carb and Bartels' manifold. He then bolted on his large plenum intake manifold loosely and installed the mounting strap to the center case bolt. Barnett cables are provided with the kit (push and pull, or just pull), but we chose to use Barnett braided cables. They work fine, but a slight modification had to be made to the cable end, which enters the guide at the billet throttle runner. Their cable ends, which protect the branded material, are stronger and more substantial than stock. Consequently, they ran into one another at the guide. With a slight tweak on just one of the cable ends, they both slipped in without a problem. I suggested greasing the cable runners in the throttle body and next to the carb, and dripping some 30-weight down the cable--before final assembly--to ensure long life. For a precision fit and a polished appearance, the entire carb is billet aluminum--even the cable linkage. Carl then installed the carb without the dome cover or the piston, installed the gas line, and turned on the gas. There is a small bridge under the piston and inside it is the main (the only jet). The float level transmits to this chamber and the gas level should be close to the top, approximately .060 to .080 below the jet orfice table--but not overflowing.

 Typhoon Twist   

by: Wrench -- EasyRider Magazine -- Reprinted with Permission

Carl Morrow of Carl's Speed Shop, previously located in Santa Fe Springs, California, had two missions in life. The first was to find ways to make Harley’s go faster, and put his riding son, Doug, in as many record books as possible. The second was to get the hell out of California! So, he's moved his entire family (they all work with him in his shop) to the seaside community of Daytona Beach, Florida. Carl's new shop was under construction during the 1995 Octoberfest; he's opening for business in January. By the time of Daytona Bike Week, his shop, located at 390 North Beach Street (a couple of blocks north of Daytona Harley) will be in full swing.

Performance is Carl's passion. His latest accomplishment is the polished Typhoon billet carburetor, based on the slide-type CV and the early side bowl Linkerts for Sportsters and the very first Shovels. Two classic carbs went into this design. The round slide in the front of the carburetor moves up and down with engine demand, keeping the velocity of the incoming air high, and allowing for extremely accurate fuel metering throughout the entire engine operating range. The carb is simple, since the CV system allows Carl to do away with accelerator pump, idle circuits, and primary and secondary jets, and leaves owners with only one jet orfice to contend with. This jet is the brass fitting in the center of the table beneath the slide. It is penetrated by the jet needle, which is attached to the slide. As the slide lifts the needle from the jet, it allows more fuel into the venturi.


Next

Next

Back

Back